Making Metallic Hydrogen at Harvard

Nearly a century after it was theorized, Harvard scientists have succeeded in creating metallic hydrogen. In addition to helping scientists answer fundamental questions about the nature of matter, the material is theorized to have a wide range of applications, ranging from room-temperature superconductors to powerful rocket propellant.

Breakthroughs such as this may be a sign of things to come regarding research into condensed matter and nuclear reactions with hydrogen at the atomic level; including LENR and other metallic lattice assisted nuclear reactions (LANR).

Duetron Importance in LENR Reactions

In an interesting paper by Magdi Ragheb, the author discusses the various mechanisms whereby deuteron disintegration in condensed matter through photonuclear and wave polarization reactions aid in the source of neutrons leading to the apparent transmutations being proffered as the source of anomalous heat in LENR events.

The author relies heavily on the Oppenheimer–Phillips process or strip reaction which is a type of deuteron-induced nuclear reaction. In this process the neutron half of an energetic deuteron (a stable isotope of hydrogen with one proton and one neutron) fuses with a target nucleus, transmuting the target to a heavier isotope while ejecting a proton.

The author discusses:

USA Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, SPAWAR experiment,
Widom-Larsen Theory,
Brillouin Energy, Controlled Electron Capture Reaction,
Andrea Rossi, E-catalyzer,
Defkalion Green Technology
Dr. Ragheb has a Ph. D. in Nuclear Engineering/Computer Sciences and is an associate professor of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering at the University of Illinois.