A New Source of Energy Using Low-Energy Fusion of Hydrogen

A new paper from Ed Storms, Research Scientist, with LENRGY, LLC, a Santa Fe, New Mexico company, has been published in Environmental Science: An Indian Journal.

Received: March 06, 2017; Accepted: March 19, 2017; Published: March 22, 2017

Citation: Storms E. A New Source of Energy using Low-Energy Fusion of Hydrogen. Environ Sci Ind J. 2017; 13(2):132.

Abstract:  This paper describes the claim for energy production based on the so-called cold fusion effect. Reasons are given to explore this energy source based on the need for such clean energy and the observed behavior. Chemical energy alone has powered civilization until relatively recently when nuclear fission power based on uranium became available. Efforts are now underway to go the next step on this path using nuclear sources by harnessing the fusion of hydrogen. The first attempt using the so-called hot fusion method has not been successful in producing practical power. Furthermore, the required generator is expected to be impractical as results of its complexity and size even after the many engineering problems are solved. Perhaps a different approach is needed. Fortunately, a new method to cause fusion using a simpler method was recently discovered; only to be widely rejected because it conflicts with what is known about nuclear interaction. This paper addresses this issue by summarizing some of the evidence supporting such a novel fusion reaction.

Researchers Shocked at UK’s Plan to Exit EU Nuclear Agency


In a surprise move, apparently in the wake of Brexit planning, the UK has announced it will no longer participate in the European Union’s nuclear agency Euratom. This could lead to less funding for the world’s largest fusion experiment, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in Cadarache, France. Billions of dollars in research into hot fusion has resulted in very little and potentially misleading progress, while modestly funded LENR firms, such as Brillouin Energy, have demonstrated excess power in repeatable testing.

Full article at Nature.com

Airbus Files More LENR Patents

Airbus continues to position itself for the application of LENR technology by applying for two additional patents.  In 2015, Airbus also published a patent for LENR power generation.

The first is for: Material arrangement for fusion reactor and method for producing the same:

“A material arrangement for a fusion reactor comprising at least one material which is configured as a foam-like carrier material for condensable binding and fusing of hydrogen. The carrier material is provided with positively charged vacancies for condensing hydrogen atoms, small pores for receiving the condensate and for accelerating the condensation after previous penetration of atoms or molecules into these, and large pores for transporting a catalyst into the small pores. Furthermore, a method for producing the material arrangement is disclosed.”

The second application is for Method and Apparatus for Generating and for Fusing Ultra-dense Hydrogen:

“A method for generating and for fusing ultra-dense hydrogen in which molecular hydrogen is fed into at least one cavity and catalyzed, where the splitting and subsequent condensation of the molecular hydrogen is initiated on a catalyst of the cavity to form an ultra-dense hydrogen. The ultra-dense hydrogen is exposed to pressure or electromagnetic radiation to initiate fusion of the ultra-dense hydrogen in the at least one cavity and the reaction heat is led out from the at least one cavity. The pressure as mechanical resonance or the electromagnetic radiation as electromagnetic resonance amplifies the field and therefore the effect. Also, an apparatus for carrying out the method is disclosed.”

Tokamak Energy Claims Fusion Reactor By 2020

From NBCNews.com

Tokamak Energy, from Oxfordshire, believes that the third version of their compact, spherical tokamak reactor will be able to reach temperatures of 100 million degrees Celsius by 2020. That’s seven times hotter than the center of the sun and the temperature necessary to achieve fusion.

Tokamak Energy says its technology would be similar in costs to a nuclear fission plant, but without any fissile material and with no risk of meltdown. The company’s CEO, David Kingham, believes it will be possible for his team to transfer energy to the grid by 2030.

Perhaps this is a bit self-serving, but if these statements are true, Tokamak reactors could challenge the current LENR projects vying for commercial success.

Boeing Patent for Nuclear Driven Engine

Fresh on the heels of the Airbus LENR patent, Boeing has now applied for a patent for a engine making use of a thermonuclear fusion process powered by lasers.  Our readers will certainly see the LENR undertones to this patent.  Read the full article here.

The race for the next generation power source for aviation is heating up and LENR – Cold Fusion is certainly among the handful of potential candidates.

LENR in 2012

As 2011 comes to a close, the debate continues over the feasibility of cold fusion, or as it is now commonly being referred, a Low Energy Nuclear Reaction.  Is Andrea Rossi an engineering genius, or simply a hoaxter?  Will commercial applications of the Rossi Ecat be made available and will other “copycats” or competitive reactors reach the market too?  Will the current LENR buzz lead to more research and credible support from the scientific community?  Will fossil fuels be relegated to fossil (irrelevant) fuels?

Time will tell, but the following articles are all betting 2012 may be the beginning of an energy revolution.

Forbes: 2012: The Year of Cold Fusion?

One More Competition (sic) For E-Cat Fusion

Rossi’s E-Cat Cold Fusion Dominates 2011

 

 

 

NASA on LENR

Last week, NASA, under the pressure of an FOIA request, released the power point slides from an internal presentation in which three of its senior scientists discussed the nature of LENR and its impacts on space and air travel.  NASA has been funding LENR research in the U.S. and has had continuing discussions with Andrea Rossi and other scientists working in the field for many years.

View NASA Slides Here

NASA’s Joseph Zawodny concludes that LENR is indeed a form of nuclear power, but not what is commonly thought of as “cold fusion.” Zawodny believes that the transformation of one element into another is consistent with neutron absorption as other scientists claim. He goes on to point out that under one theory of what is happening, decay products of the reaction are turned into heat and gamma rays are screened out. In comparing the energy output of LENR to fission, conventional fusion, and chemical reactions, Zawodny notes that LENR is theoretically capable of producing 8 million times as much energy as a comparable chemical reaction. This of course explains why a very slow reaction can produce excess heat while consuming only minimal amounts of hydrogen and nickel.

From The Peak Oil Crisis: E=mc2