Deuteron Disintegration In Condensed Matter

The debacle that resulted from the 1989 announcements of Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons at the University of Utah had quite a negative affect on cold fusion and LENR research. Many would say it became career suicide in academia to be a proponent of LENR research.

Dr. George Miley and associates at the University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign have bucked this trend. Dr. Magdi Ragheb, Associate Professor of the Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, has incorporated some LENR discussion into his course, Nuclear Power Engineering 402. In fact, an essay entitled Deuteron Disintegration In Condensed Matter, gives a good overview of some of the competing LENR technologies and theories out there.

We commend this type of exposure and education to our future nuclear engineers and academics.  One of these students just might lead the way to developing commercial or useful fusion – LENR technology.  Good luck on the midterms!

Duetron Importance in LENR Reactions

In an interesting paper by Magdi Ragheb, the author discusses the various mechanisms whereby deuteron disintegration in condensed matter through photonuclear and wave polarization reactions aid in the source of neutrons leading to the apparent transmutations being proffered as the source of anomalous heat in LENR events.

The author relies heavily on the Oppenheimer–Phillips process or strip reaction which is a type of deuteron-induced nuclear reaction. In this process the neutron half of an energetic deuteron (a stable isotope of hydrogen with one proton and one neutron) fuses with a target nucleus, transmuting the target to a heavier isotope while ejecting a proton.

The author discusses:

USA Navy’s Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center, SPAWAR experiment,
Widom-Larsen Theory,
Brillouin Energy, Controlled Electron Capture Reaction,
Andrea Rossi, E-catalyzer,
Defkalion Green Technology
Dr. Ragheb has a Ph. D. in Nuclear Engineering/Computer Sciences and is an associate professor of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering at the University of Illinois.