Low Energy Nuclear Reaction

Andrea Rossi’s recent developments with his Ecat reactor has cast a new light on LENR (low energy nuclear reaction) research.  Often synonymous with “Cold Fusion,” widespread scientific and mainstream attention began with the assertions of Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons, whom posited that  previously unknown kinds of nuclear reactions and excess heat of a large magnitude could be observed in certain electrochemical cells.

With these principles in mind, Melvin Miles and colleagues were among the first researchers to observe the temporally correlated production of helium and heat during LENR electrolytic experiments.  Miles’ work was groundbreaking in that it showed that the heat was related to some sort of nuclear effect.

Dr. Randell Mills and others reported significant excess heat from ordinary water cells with nickel electrodes, an energy which they deemed to be coming not from nuclear reactions, but from a new form of catalyzed shrinkage reaction via a remodeled form of the hydrogen atom, dubbed “hydrinos.”  Mills has gone on to try and distance himself from the Cold Fusion moniker to write his own model of quantum mechanics and start commercial production of his own energy source.

What is the correlation between nickel and hydrogen atoms that strongly hints at a low level nuclear reaction can occur with the proper catalysts?  Time will tell as a world dominated by massive fossil fuel consumption looks for new sources of renewable energy.

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H Marks the Spot

Imagine a world with clean and renewable sources of energy.  Now imagine the source of this energy is in the air you breathe and in the water your drink.

Hydrogen is the most abundant and the most basic element in the universe.  A hydrogen atom contains a single electron and a single proton.  Like many elements, hydrogen is very stable in its ground state, or at its state of lowest energy.  Theoretically, if a hydrogen atom where to shrink and reach an even lower level of energy, a release of some excess energy would occur.

According to Dr. Randell Mills, when a hydrogen atom collides with certain other atoms or ions, it can transfer a quantity of energy to the other atom, shrinking at the same time, creating a so-called “hydrino” in the process.  The atom that it collided with is called the “catalyst”, as it helps the hydrino shrink.  Once a hydrino has formed, it can shrink even further through collisions with other catalyst atoms or even other hydrinos.  Each successive collision results in further shrinkage and each level of shrinkage releases more energy than the previous level.

There is speculation that Andrea Rossi and Dr. Sergio Focardi’s Ecat reactor is creating hydrinos through a novel non-radiative transmutation of hydrogen and nanoparticles of nickel into copper with the help of a proprietary catalyst.  The result, according to their claims, is a release of excess energy in which their device is used to heat water and produce steam.  This steam can then be used to create electricity.

Imagine the possibilities indeed.

Josh Cole, J.D., Contributor