A New Source of Energy Using Low-Energy Fusion of Hydrogen

A new paper from Ed Storms, Research Scientist, with LENRGY, LLC, a Santa Fe, New Mexico company, has been published in Environmental Science: An Indian Journal.

Received: March 06, 2017; Accepted: March 19, 2017; Published: March 22, 2017

Citation: Storms E. A New Source of Energy using Low-Energy Fusion of Hydrogen. Environ Sci Ind J. 2017; 13(2):132.

Abstract:  This paper describes the claim for energy production based on the so-called cold fusion effect. Reasons are given to explore this energy source based on the need for such clean energy and the observed behavior. Chemical energy alone has powered civilization until relatively recently when nuclear fission power based on uranium became available. Efforts are now underway to go the next step on this path using nuclear sources by harnessing the fusion of hydrogen. The first attempt using the so-called hot fusion method has not been successful in producing practical power. Furthermore, the required generator is expected to be impractical as results of its complexity and size even after the many engineering problems are solved. Perhaps a different approach is needed. Fortunately, a new method to cause fusion using a simpler method was recently discovered; only to be widely rejected because it conflicts with what is known about nuclear interaction. This paper addresses this issue by summarizing some of the evidence supporting such a novel fusion reaction.

Recoil Assisted Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

Low energy nuclear processes that are strongly hindered by Coulomb repulsion between the reacting nuclei, are investigated in solid environment. It is shown that the hindering effect may be significantly weakened (practically it disappears) if one takes into account the Coulomb interaction of one of the reacting particles with the surroundings. … Low energy nuclear reactions allowed by recoil assistance and leading to nuclear transmutations are partly overviewed. Critical analysis of Fleischmann-Pons type low energy nuclear reaction experiments is presented too.

Budapest University of Technology and Economics,
Institute of Physics, Budafoki ut 8. F., H-1521 Budapest, Hungary