The Hydrino

We’ve post a few articles on Randell Mills and Brilliant Light Power, formerly Black Light Power and the hydrino theory.  If their reported progress is real, Mills and BLP may indeed be the most promising alternative energy to watch.

LENR may be tangental to Mills’ research or perhaps the LENR effect is being confused with the waste heat produced by Mills’ hydrino formation theory.  The basic theory is that through a chemical reaction, a hydrogen atom can be altered to a different state where the electron drops into a lower energy state and the resulting excess binding energy is released as light and x-rays which can be harvested through photovoltaic cells.

Condensed Plasmoids Theory

In an article called “Condensed Plasmoids – The Intermediate State of LENR“, submitted for the ICCF-20 proceedings in late 2016, Lutz Jaitner, expounds on a theory for LENR from the theoretical findings of researchers such as Ken Shoulders and Edward H. Lewis.

The theory opines “atoms can enter a previously unknown state of matter, in which they behave like ball lightning, and which is an intermediate state of the LENR reaction. Nuclei and the electrons are moving rapidly in opposite directions along the plasma wire which results in a strong electric current through the wire, pinching the plasma thin via its strong magnetic field. This enables nuclear reactions between the ions via strong electronic screening of the Coulomb barrier and via self-amplifying longitudinal density oscillations of the plasma.”

The author’s site is worth checking out.

Brillouin: Electron Capture Model

Below is a new Brillouin Energy presentation, narrated by its founder, Robert Godes, which was prepared for the ICCF19 conference in Padua, Italy in April 2015. Andrea Rossi has recently made disparaging remarks about the Electron Capture Theory, however, Brillouin appears to consistently make strides in control, COP and commercialization efforts.

 

LENR: A Theoretical Model is Coming

Michael McKubre, an esteemed electrochemist at SRI International, has been at the forefront of Cold Fusion/LENR research from the beginning.  A former student of Martin Fleischmann, Dr. McKubre has been an integral figure in ongoing LENR research and testing.

In a recently published interview in New Scientist, Dr. McKubre speaks of his mentor’s legacy and a theoretical model on his controversial work:

We need a good, sound theoretical model – then we can experimentally test it. We have a general idea of what’s generating the heat, but the details – how deuterium nuclei get together to fuse – have yet to be resolved. The hot fusion folk who criticised cold fusion got one thing right: if it were a pairwise reaction of only two deuterium nuclei, like in free space, you should always see the same products as in hot fusion. But, generally, we don’t see those types of products. A theoretical model is coming. I wouldn’t be surprised if we have a good one in the next four or five months.